Lamont Lindstrom

Lamont Lindstrom, Kendall Professor and Chair of Anthropology at the University of Tulsa, has long-term research interests in Vanuatu and other Melanesian countries focused on local knowledge systems and social movements, kava, urban migration, World War Two ethnohistory, contemporary chiefs and the politics of tradition, cultural policy development, sociolinguistics, urban migration and personhood, and early photography. Tanna Times: Islanders in the World is his latest book.

 

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Joseph Weber

Joseph Weber teaches at the College of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as the Jerry and Karla Huse Professor of News-Editorial. He joined the college in 2009 after working for 35 years in journalism, including 22 years at BusinessWeek magazine, which he left as chief of correspondents and Chicago bureau chief. He has also taught at Tsinghua University in Beijing and the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics.

Weber is the author of Transcendental Meditation in America: How a New Age Movement Remade and Small Town in Iowa (University of Iowa Press, 2014), Divided Loyalties: Young Somali Americans and the Lure of Extremism (Michigan State University Press, 2020), and Rhymes with Fighter: Clayton Yeutter, American Statesman (University of Nebraska Press, 2021).

He has published papers in Human Rights Quarterly, Journalism and Mass Communication Educator, Middle West Review and Utopian Studies. He also published work in The Washington Post, Miami Herald, Columbia Journalism Review and The National Journal.

He earned an undergraduate degree in English from Rutgers College and a master’s degree in journalism from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

 

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Jennifer Koshatka Seman

Dr. Jennifer Koshatka Seman currently teaches courses in Multicultural American history and Latin American history at Metropolitan State University of Denver where she is a Lecturer in History. Her research interests lie in the interaction between subaltern practices and institutional forms of power in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands and the U.S. West and the ways in which race, gender, and spirituality inform this interaction.  Jennifer is the author of Borderlands Curanderos: The Worlds of Santa Teresa Urrea and Don Pedrito Jaramillo (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2021), her first book. Borderlands Curanderos about the “small worlds” of two Mexican faith healers, or curanderos, Santa Teresa Urrea and Don Pedrito Jaramillo, and how they informed the “larger worlds” of the turn-of-the-century when they crossed the border from Mexico to the United States and healed individual bodies as well as the larger social body, especially people of Mexican descent and Indigenous peoples, that faced with increasingly oppressive, exclusionary, and violent state power in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Jennifer received her doctorate in history from Southern Methodist University and has published her research in the journals Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses and Journal of the West in addition to presenting it at conferences for the Western Historical Association, Texas Historical Association, American Historical Association, and History of Science Society.

 

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Michelle Mueller

Michelle Mueller earned her PhD from the Graduate Theological Union in the area of Cultural and Historical Studies of Religions. She is a specialist of gender and sexuality in new religious movements. Her book, New Religions and the Mediation of Non-Monogamy: Polyamory, Polygamy, and Reality Television, examines the relationship between alternative American religions and the media representation of non-monogamies on reality-TV shows like Sister WivesSeeking Sister Wife, and Polyamory: Married & Dating. She has published in Nova Religio, Theology & Sexuality, and The Pomegranate. She has chapters in The Rowman & Littlefield Handbook of Women’s Studies in Religion and Female Leaders in New Religious Movements. She has taught for several Bay Area colleges.

 

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Nancy Lusignan Schultz

Nancy Lusignan Schultz is professor emerita at Salem State University in Salem, Massachusetts. She is the author of Fire and Roses: The Burning of the Charlestown Convent (2000) and Mrs. Mattingly’s Miracle: The Prince, the Widow, and the Cure that Shocked Washington City (2011). She is the editor of four anthologies. Her most recent, with Beth L. Lueck and Sirpa Salenius, is Transatlantic Conversations: Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Encounters with Italy and the Atlantic World (2017). She is treasurer and a founding officer of the Harriet Beecher Stowe Society. Schultz has recently been commissioned by the editors of Oxford University Press’ The Collected Works of Harriet Beecher Stowe to edit the forthcoming poetry volume.

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Anne Kreps

Anne Kreps focuses on Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, and has particular interest in Valentinian and Gnostic Christianities.  She is working on a monograph called The Crucified Book, which examines early Christian theories of sacred writing.  Professor Kreps is also interested in New Religious Movements, particularly those who look to the Essenes of antiquity to shape group identity.  Before moving to Eugene, she was an Assistant Professor at Yale-NUS College in Singapore.

 

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Michael Ashcraft

Michael Ashcraft is a Professor of Religion at Truman State University in Kirksville, Missouri.  He has published The Dawn of the New Cycle: Point Loma Theosophists and American Culture (2002) and A Historical Introduction to the Study of New Religious Movments  (2018).

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Michele Olzi

Michele Olzi received his PhD degree in Medical Humanities from the University of Insubria (Varese) in 2019. His research project focused on the life and work of the Italian psychoanalyst Emilio Servadio (1904-1995). He was appointed an Assistant Professor of Political Theory and Sociology of Political Processes at the University of Insubria in 2018. His interests include new religious movements, the connection between religions and the media, the analysis of political myths, neo-gnosticism and techno-gnosticism, historico-ideological and political interactions of the notions of the sacred, power, and eros. He edits the online journal La Rosa di Paracelso.

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Kate Kingsbury

Dr. Kate Kingsbury obtained her doctorate in anthropology at the University of Oxford, where she also did her MPhil. Dr Kingsbury has done fieldwork in Africa and Latin America on spirituality, looking at how marginalised groups use this to assert agency and create counterhegemonic discourses around identity, gender and power. She did fieldwork in Mali with female witchcraft practitioners who used sorcery to gain agency, and in Senegal with disenfranchised Sufi youth, and Mouride street kids. She has been doing fieldwork in Mexico since 2017 on the female followers of Santa Muerte and female foundational figures, spending her time immersed in a local community in rural Oaxaca with curanderos, leaders and devotees of Santa Muerte to better understand the faith and its importance for reconfiguring conceptions of gender, power and identity. She is the author of the forthcoming book on Santa Muerte “Daughters of Death: Female Followers of Santa Muerte” with Oxford University Press. Dr. Kingsbury is a staunch believer in equal rights and the power of education to ameliorate global disparities. She also works pro bono for a non profit organisation that aims to empower and educate girls in Uganda, Africa.  www.uganda4her.org

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Kevin Coffee

Kevin Coffee is a museum scholar, archaeologist and educator and holds post-graduate degrees (MA) in museum studies and in archaeology from the University of Leicester in the UK. Over the past three decades he has advised philanthropic individuals, museums and other non-profit organizations on the preservation and interpretation of material culture, buildings and landscapes in North America, Asia and Europe. His research explores social practices and built culture of 18th, 19th and 20th century trans-Atlantic societies, including industrialization, urbanization, and ideas of class, gender and ethnicity. In current work, he focuses on the ideo-cultural factors that overlay and undergird industrialization and urbanization in the modern era.

 

 

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